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Eesti alalise esindaja ÜRO juures Margus Kolga sõnavõtt ÜRO Julgeoleku Nõukogu debatil "Rahvusvahelise rahu ja julgeoleku kindlustamine: piraatlus"

19.11.2012

Thank you, Mr. President for convening this meeting. I would also like to express appreciation for the Deputy Secretary-General, Jan Eliasson, for his statement.

Estonia aligns itself with the statement to be delivered by the European Union and would like to make the following additional remarks.

 

Piracy is a major threat to commercial shipping with an immense cost to global economy. Besides economic loss and implications to regional and global security, it also bears huge human cost for seafarers and their families. Drawing from our own experience, seafarers of any nationality are at risk of being taken hostage. Piracy affects us all and it should be tackled in a joint international effort. In this regard we commend UNSC work on piracy related issues, in particular concerning the piracy off the coast of Somalia. It is important to bear in mind that acts of piracy and armed robbery are increasingly prevalent elsewhere, in particular in Gulf of Guinea. Therefore, we welcome the attempt to have an integrated look at the situation.

 

Estonia is actively contributing to the fight against piracy off the coast of Somalia, by participating in the EU anti-piracy operation EUNAVFOR Atalanta launched in 2008. In cooperation with France and Germany, our Vessel Protection Detachment Team (VPD) has embarked and escorted several World Food Programme (WFP) vessels delivering humanitarian aid to Somalia, as well as vessels providing equipment and supplies to AMISOM. Estonian VPD team together with French troops has also been involved in the training of AMISOM forces, with the aim of helping them to develop their own vessel protection capabilities. We have already decided to continue our contribution at least until the end of the current mandate.

 

Our active participation in the fight against piracy off the coast of Somalia has given us an understanding of the complexity of challenges and problems related to piracy. One of the challenges has been the legal basis allowing the deployment of the VPD-s on the board of vulnerable shipping. We urge all nations whose ships sail in the waters affected by piracy to bear their responsibility for ships and crews under their flags by signing flag state declarations, in order to enable to the vessel protection detachments to board the vessels and provide effective protection and deterrence against pirate attacks. The role of shipping industry in protecting ships and seafarers can also not be underestimated. Compliance with the Best Management Practices adopted by IMO should be promoted whenever possible. Arrangements for the use of privately contracted armed security personnel on ships deserve further attention.

 

Military presence in the Horn of Africa region through operation Atalanta and other coalitions and nations involved have contributed to a significant drop in numbers of piracy attacks in 2012, achieving its lowest level since 2008, which demonstrates the effectiveness of joint international efforts and cooperation.

 

In spite of this relative success, it is clear that the military response alone is not enough and more is to be done on the land. In order to address the root causes of piracy, and comprehensive, integrated approach is needed. Somalia is a good example of different aspects which need to be addressed – political process, security situation, rule of law, good governance, human rights, economic, social and humanitarian situation.

 

One of the key elements in the fight against piracy is the establishment of   Rule of Law and ending impunity. Estonia would like to highlight three aspects. Firstly, states should review their relevant legislation in order to be able to prosecute international crimes like piracy. Secondly, in order to ensure that criminal proceedings will take place in full conformity with international human rights standards, it is vital to make sure that there is sufficient evidence gathering. States should tackle effectively any legal, technical or training-related issues that have risen. And thirdly, a great deal of work has been done by relevant participants (UNODC, UNDP, regional actors) in order to increase the regional capacity to prosecute possible criminals. Taking account the above, Estonia fully supports the efforts made in all three aspects by all states and organizations. Fighting international crimes needs an effective international cooperation.

 

Thank you, Mr. President.

Thank you, Mr. President for convening this meeting. I would also like to express appreciation for the Deputy Secretary-General, Jan Eliasson, for his statement.

Estonia aligns itself with the statement to be delivered by the European Union and would like to make the following additional remarks.

 

Piracy is a major threat to commercial shipping with an immense cost to global economy. Besides economic loss and implications to regional and global security, it also bears huge human cost for seafarers and their families. Drawing from our own experience, seafarers of any nationality are at risk of being taken hostage. Piracy affects us all and it should be tackled in a joint international effort. In this regard we commend UNSC work on piracy related issues, in particular concerning the piracy off the coast of Somalia. It is important to bear in mind that acts of piracy and armed robbery are increasingly prevalent elsewhere, in particular in Gulf of Guinea. Therefore, we welcome the attempt to have an integrated look at the situation.

 

Estonia is actively contributing to the fight against piracy off the coast of Somalia, by participating in the EU anti-piracy operation EUNAVFOR Atalanta launched in 2008. In cooperation with France and Germany, our Vessel Protection Detachment Team (VPD) has embarked and escorted several World Food Programme (WFP) vessels delivering humanitarian aid to Somalia, as well as vessels providing equipment and supplies to AMISOM. Estonian VPD team together with French troops has also been involved in the training of AMISOM forces, with the aim of helping them to develop their own vessel protection capabilities. We have already decided to continue our contribution at least until the end of the current mandate.

 

Our active participation in the fight against piracy off the coast of Somalia has given us an understanding of the complexity of challenges and problems related to piracy. One of the challenges has been the legal basis allowing the deployment of the VPD-s on the board of vulnerable shipping. We urge all nations whose ships sail in the waters affected by piracy to bear their responsibility for ships and crews under their flags by signing flag state declarations, in order to enable to the vessel protection detachments to board the vessels and provide effective protection and deterrence against pirate attacks. The role of shipping industry in protecting ships and seafarers can also not be underestimated. Compliance with the Best Management Practices adopted by IMO should be promoted whenever possible. Arrangements for the use of privately contracted armed security personnel on ships deserve further attention.

 

Military presence in the Horn of Africa region through operation Atalanta and other coalitions and nations involved have contributed to a significant drop in numbers of piracy attacks in 2012, achieving its lowest level since 2008, which demonstrates the effectiveness of joint international efforts and cooperation.

 

In spite of this relative success, it is clear that the military response alone is not enough and more is to be done on the land. In order to address the root causes of piracy, and comprehensive, integrated approach is needed. Somalia is a good example of different aspects which need to be addressed – political process, security situation, rule of law, good governance, human rights, economic, social and humanitarian situation.

 

One of the key elements in the fight against piracy is the establishment of   Rule of Law and ending impunity. Estonia would like to highlight three aspects. Firstly, states should review their relevant legislation in order to be able to prosecute international crimes like piracy. Secondly, in order to ensure that criminal proceedings will take place in full conformity with international human rights standards, it is vital to make sure that there is sufficient evidence gathering. States should tackle effectively any legal, technical or training-related issues that have risen. And thirdly, a great deal of work has been done by relevant participants (UNODC, UNDP, regional actors) in order to increase the regional capacity to prosecute possible criminals. Taking account the above, Estonia fully supports the efforts made in all three aspects by all states and organizations. Fighting international crimes needs an effective international cooperation.

 

Thank you, Mr. President.

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